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Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies/ICCS Rome (Duke University)
Rome, Italy (Outgoing Program)
Program Terms: Fall,
Spring
This program is currently not accepting applications.
Homepage: Click to visit
Restrictions: Gustavus applicants only
Budget Sheets Fall,
Spring
Dates / Deadlines:
There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Fact Sheet:
Program Provider:
ICCS - Duke University Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies
Program Term(s):
Semester only
Minimum Class Standing:
Sophomore
Minimum GPA:
3.00
Prerequisites:
Yes
Previous Language Study Req?:
No
Language of Instruction:
English
Language courses offered:
Ancient Greek, Italian, Latin
Housing Options:
Residence Hall
Areas of Study:
Archaeology, Art History, Classical Studies, Greek (ancient), Greek Language & Literature, History, Italian Language & Literature, Latin, Sociology
Program Design: Group based, Study Center, Theme based
Additional Program Options:
NA
Program Description:

ICCS Rome

Ancient ruins in Rome

The Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (ICCS) was established in 1965 by representatives of ten American colleges and universities; the number of member institutions has now grown to over 100. It provides undergraduate students with an opportunity in Rome to study ancient history, archaeology, Greek and Latin literature, Italian language, and ancient art. ICCS has received generous aid from the Danforth Foundation, The Old Dominion Foundation, The Mellon Foundation, and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, as well as the continuing support of a consortium of colleges and universities, and contributions from former students.

A Managing Committee elected by the consortium colleges and universities determines the curriculum and selects the faculty, students, and scholarship recipients. The Managing Committee has arranged for administration of the Intercollegiate Center to be handled by Duke University's Global Education Office for Undergraduates.

Academics
The curriculum is structured differently from that in many American colleges and universities. Students are expected to take four courses, which is a minimum and normal load; a few students take five courses. A major part of the academic work is a required comprehensive and integrated course called The Ancient City.  It is a two-credit (2 GAC unit) course that requires as much class and study time as two semester courses. It covers Roman archaeology and topography, aspects of social and urban history of Rome, and Roman civilization. Frequent site visits and explorations, intensive museum tours and lectures, and wider-ranging trips based on the Professor-in-Charge's area's of expertise outside Rome are included as part of the course. In the recent past, Campania and Sicily have been the focus of extended and focused study. Because The Ancient City course depends on prior knowledge of Roman history, students are expected to prepare themselves by taking a Roman history course or by careful reading on the subject.

Students choose their courses from the following:
  • Ancient City, CLST 341A-1/341A-2 (2 course credits) - REQUIRED
  • Intermediate Latin, LATIN 203A-1 (1 course credit)
  • Advanced Latin, LATIN 301A-1 (1 course credit)
  • Intermediate Greek, GREEK 203A-1 (1 course credit)
  • Advanced Greek, GREEK  301A (1 course credit)
  • Renaissance and Baroque Art History, ARTHIST 255A (1 course credit)
  • Elementary Italian, ITALIAN 101A (1 course credit)
The Center
Located in a four-story building on one of the main streets of the Janiculum, the Center is ten minutes by bus from the Piazza Venezia and downtown Rome. It is close to the American Academy in Rome, with which it maintains cordial relations. The building is owned by an order of nuns, the Suore Infermiere dell'Addolorata, and contains bedrooms (mostly doubles) for 36 students, classrooms, a library, offices, dining rooms, and a kitchen.

Outside is a small and pleasant garden. The neighborhood is residential with apartment buildings, small shops, cafes, and services. Three meals a day are provided at the Center, Monday through Friday. Other meals are at individual student's expense and are not included in the program fees.

Because the Center is small, and all students are together for meals and at least the Ancient City course,  the living situation can be very intense and generally requires adjustment on everyone's part. Students are urged to have a positive outlook and to spend available time outside of the Center.

Note on physical demands. The program is as physically strenuous as it is rewarding. The on-site investigations fundamental to the Ancient City course entail extensive walking and some climbing, at times in inclement weather. Our experience has been that participants must be in good physical condition to be able to participate successfully. Therefore, we ask that applicants consider their general health, physical abilities, and stamina (including problems with diet and medications) before applying to this program.

More information on the ICCS program >>>

 
This program is currently not accepting applications.